Harker Island Marsh

LoriHarrisPhotography

Beautiful Summer March, Harkers Island, NC by Lori Harris Photography

Lori Harris Photography

Every moment changing with the tide, the marsh. Continuos discovery and visuals, the marsh.

Lori Harris Photography

A lane in the marsh. Photography by Lori Harris Photography

LoriHarrisPhotography

God’s country, the marsh. Home.

LoriHarrisPhotography

Sunset Harkers Island Marsh. LoriHarrisPhotography

LoriHarrisPhotography

Embracing nature is a gift. Be blessed!

Advertisements

Buzzards, Vultures in the Marsh

Up high patiently waiting for clearance to swoop down and steal a bit of the roadside kill – a decaying kit fox next to the marsh bridge were two Turkey Buzzards, also known as Turkey Vulture.
http://wncnaturecenter.com/Animals/Birds/TurkeyVulture.aspx

20130824-163159.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

My admiration is of the wing span size and essence of survival. Definitely not for their beauty, as they are grotesque and vicious looking.

20130824-163443.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

Periwinkle Gastropod.

Up an down they go, with the tides. Marsh periwinkles, or marsh snails (Littorina irrorata) are found in and around the marshes in North Carolina.

20130428-212256.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

Periwinkles play an important role in the decomposition of marsh grasses (detritus), which helps maintain a healthy salt marsh community. Science considers them an “indicator species.” If periwinkle populations are doing well, chances are the salt marsh is doing well. http://www.thepilot.com/news/2009/may/31/ask-the-aquarium-marsh-periwinkles-indicator/

20130428-212641.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

I am always mesmerized by the numbers and beauty of the ecosystem of our marsh.

20130428-213736.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

Here is a site with macro photography of these marsh snails by Jeffrey Pippen: http://people.duke.edu/~jspippen/mollusca/marshsnails.htm

The Saltier the Better

According to science, the culture conditions and genetics are what determine the level of saltiness of an oyster (Crassosstrea Virginica). There are many who are repulsed by the appearance, texture and taste of of an oyster. However, there are those of us who savor the beauty of its unique shell, toothy and slimy texture, and the salty bliss and burst of flavor.

20130324-104134.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

Oyster clusters thrive in shallow waters in and about the shorelines, inlets and marshes of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Their place in nature serves to preserve and cleanse the waters where they grow.

20130324-104334.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

Those of us who are attracted to this cuisine often create traditions surrounding the gathering of friends and family or people at festivals with the sole purpose to celebrate the oyster. The cleaning and preparations are a full days effort resulting in steaming or cooking, shucking, garnering, and eating the delectable gems of nature.

20130324-104548.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

20130324-104911.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

20130324-104718.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

20130324-104814.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

There are many foods that nature gifts to us, but the oyster is SOUL food at its best!

20130324-110726.jpg
Lori Harris Photography

The Great Heron

The Great Heron
Lori Harris Photography

20130217-200410.jpg

Strength, life longevity, purity, wisdom, creation, and a messenger of the gods. The Heron stand still in the marsh. Long black stick legs, steady and slow until the fish is targeted. One quick stab of the long orange beak awards this bird it’s nutrition. It’s nest are high in the trees. It’s flight graceful and smooth across the marsh. Aware and in tune, ready to act. I feel at peace each time I am honored and blessed with their presence.